Do You Know How To Energize People?
Epstein Motivation Competencies Inventory for Managers (EMCI-m) v. 1.3, © 2007-2017, Dr. Robert Epstein  

You are about to take the unabridged version of the Epstein Motivation Competencies Inventory for Managers (or EMCI-m). Designed by Dr. Robert Epstein (follow on Twitter at @DrREpstein), one of America's most distinguished psychologists, this scientifically-validated test is an inventory of ten types of skills that managers need in order to motivate their subordinates. Although designed for business, the test is also helpful for parents and teachers.

Most people are able to complete the test in less than 15 minutes, and there are no right or wrong answers. Just select the response that seems best. After you answer the questions, you will be given a detailed report that will give you your scores and explain what they mean. This is just the start; once you know your EMCI scores, there are many avenues you might pursue to improve your motivation skills. Dr. Epstein's book, The Big Book of Motivation Games, includes 47 games and exercises to strengthen such skills, as well as an abridged, self-scorable version of the EMCI-m.

If you are conducting research and would like to collect raw data for a group that is taking this test - for a business, research study, classroom activity, or other purpose - please see our Group Testing Instructions

If you are interested in motivating yourself, you might want to take the Epstein Motivation Competencies Inventory for Individuals (EMCI-i), which measures eight core competencies that are essential for individual motivation. That test can be accessed free of charge at MyMotivationSkills.com.

Before we get to the inventory itself, we'll ask you a few basic questions about yourself. Demographic information is being collected for research purposes only and will be kept strictly confidential.

To make sure the scoring is accurate, be sure to fill in all the blanks!

*Required response


Group code (if applicable):


*First name and last initial:

*Age: 

*Highest Degree:
None
High School
Community College
Bachelors
Masters
Doctorate

*Race/Ethnicity:
White
Black
Hispanic
Asian
American Indian
Other

*Gender:
Male
Female
Other

*Organization Type:
Business
Non-Profit
School
Home
Other

*How fluent are you in English?
Not fluent   10  Very fluent

*In general, how motivated are your subordinates?
A great deal   10  Poorly

*In general, how strong is morale among your subordinates?
Very strong   10  Very poor

*In general, how productive are your subordinates?
Very productive   10  Not productive

*In general, how much turnover is there among your subordinates?
Low turnover   10  High turnover

*Generally speaking, how motivated are you?
Highly motivated   10  Not motivated

*Have you had any training in how to motivate people?
No  Yes

*If so, approximately how many hours of training have you had?


Where did you receive this training?


*How many years have you been in a management position?


*How many people in your organization are you responsible for?


Thanks! Now here is the test itself:

For each of the following questions, select the answer that best applies to you.


*1. Office parties are a waste of time.
Agree             Disagree


*2. I regularly assess the skills and competencies of my employees.
Agree             Disagree


*3. I use color systematically to boost productivity throughout the workplace.
Agree             Disagree


*4. Office parties can be great motivators.
Agree             Disagree


*5. Disputes within the workplace decrease productivity.
Agree             Disagree


*6. I am almost always enthusiastic around the workplace.
Agree             Disagree


*7. It's generally cheaper to replace people than to train them.
Agree             Disagree


*8. I always try to give my employees tasks that suit their abilities.
Agree             Disagree


*9. I take individual differences into account when organizing a team.
Agree             Disagree


*10. Giving people more resources is generally cheaper than replacing those people.
Agree             Disagree


*11. I regularly assess my employees to determine their training needs.
Agree             Disagree


*12. Training people generally costs less than replacing them.
Agree             Disagree


*13. I try to allocate resources to employees in a way they will consider fair.
Agree             Disagree


*14. I regularly try to push my employees to new levels of performance.
Agree             Disagree


*15. I try to communicate a clear vision of the future to employees.
Agree             Disagree


*16. I regularly try to help my employees to manage stress.
Agree             Disagree


*17. I apply ergonomic principles in the design of my workplace.
Agree             Disagree


*18. I provide training for my employees on a regular basis.
Agree             Disagree


*19. I try to give people the space, materials, and time they need to perform.
Agree             Disagree


*20. Whether my employees get along with each other is none of my business.
Agree             Disagree


*21. Resolving conflicts among my employees is an important part of my job.
Agree             Disagree


*22. Rewards are valuable in maintaining good performance.
Agree             Disagree


*23. Irritating sounds can reduce motivation.
Agree             Disagree


*24. Giving people challenging assignments is a great way to enhance their creativity.
Agree             Disagree


*25. Training outside one's current area of expertise can stimulate creativity.
Agree             Disagree


*26. I often reward excellence among my employees.
Agree             Disagree


*27. I rarely try to push my employees to new levels of performance.
Agree             Disagree


*28. People generally find the same things rewarding.
Agree             Disagree


*29. I regularly practice relaxation techniques while I'm working.
Agree             Disagree


*30. Rewards motivate people better than instructions do.
Agree             Disagree


*31. I welcome people's questions.
Agree             Disagree


*32. What people find rewarding varies from person to person.
Agree             Disagree


*33. Giving people extra material resources or time can help them be creative.
Agree             Disagree


*34. It bothers me when employees ask too many questions.
Agree             Disagree


*35. I regularly help my team to reach a consensus on key issues.
Agree             Disagree


*36. When an employee can't do a job, I usually assume it's his or her fault.
Agree             Disagree


*37. I have little control over my own motivational states.
Agree             Disagree


*38. Every task requires a unique set of competencies.
Agree             Disagree


*39. I often ask employees to give me feedback on my ideas.
Agree             Disagree


*40. I always try to match up my employees with the tasks that best suit them.
Agree             Disagree


*41. I try to involve employees in many aspects of decision making.
Agree             Disagree


*42. I regularly use a variety of techniques to keep my motivation level high.
Agree             Disagree


*43. I always give open-ended assignments in order to maximize performance.
Agree             Disagree


*44. I try to keep updated on the interpersonal relationships of my employees.
Agree             Disagree


*45. I sometimes fail to give people the resources they need to do their jobs.
Agree             Disagree


*46. I sometimes post affirmations or other motivational materials where I work.
Agree             Disagree


*47. Proper lighting can boost performance and motivation.
Agree             Disagree


*48. I sometimes use games and exercises to keep team spirit high.
Agree             Disagree


*49. I try to resolve conflicts between employees before they escalate.
Agree             Disagree


*50. Lighting has little effect on performance and motivation.
Agree             Disagree